The Dogs of Jackie O: Jacqueline Kennedy’s Lifetime of Canine Companions

Two-year old Miss Bouvier with her apparent first dog, name and breed unknown, 1931.

Two-year old Miss Bouvier with her apparent first dog, name and breed unknown, 1931.

From her earliest childhood days on Long Island, through her youth in New York, Newport, Rhode Island and McLean, Virginia, to her public period as the wife of a U.S. Senator in Washington and in the White House as First Lady of the United States, to her life afterwards as the world’s most famous woman on Fifth Avenue in New York, Avenue Foch in Paris and on Skorpios Island, Greece, there was one element to her life which remained as consistent as her highly individualistic approach to living.

Jacqueline Lee Bouvier Kennedy Onassis loved her dogs.

And she didn’t discriminate based on breed or size, her menageries over the years including spaniel to daschund to poodle to shepherd to mixed-breed.

Although much has been written about how the radical differences in personality between her father, John “Black Jack” Bouvier and her mother Janet Norton Lee, is what essentially led to their acrimonious separation in 1936 and divorce in 1940 when their eldest child “Jackie” was eleven years old, Jack and Janet shared one bond which they jointly passed on to her – that love of dogs.

In fact, as a very young child, Jackie Bouvier often expressed her views by assigning human emotions, thoughts and feelings to dogs. The very first “book” she wrote was The Adventures of George Woofty, Esquire, a star-crossed love story between two dogs who couldn’t marry because they were of different breeds.

Dogs were also the subject which compelled her determination to publicly express her opinion on a trending social issue.  When her father read to her a newspaper story on the subject of vivisection on dogs, Jackie Bouvier became enraged. She directed her anger by dictating her feelings to her father, who composed it all in a telegram, registering her protest against the practice of medical experimentation on dogs, which he then sent to the New York  Journal-American.

It is difficult to precisely chronicle just which dogs she shared her life with on a permanent basis as a child and which were “borrowed.”  It is known that the first dog to which she became extremely attached was Hootchie, a Scottish Terrier. When she was only two years old, she posed with him for a family snapshot in an informal setting. Other dogs she was snapped hugging and wrapping her arm around may well have been entered as contestants in the annual East Hampton Dog Show.

When she was seven years old and began to spend weekend time with her father, he often “rented” a dog from a local pet shop for Jackie and her younger sister Lee to enjoy and foster-care, including walks in Central Park and, during summers, along the country roads at his family’s seasonal home in East Hampton. One of the regulars was the massive King Phar, a Harlequin Great Dane, which frightened most adults – but not little Jackie.

Jackie Bouvier with Hoochie a Scottish Terrier, often identified as the first she owned, 1932.

Jackie Bouvier with Hoochie a Scottish Terrier, often identified as the first she owned, 1932.

Jackie Bouvier with Hoochie the Scottie.

Jackie Bouvier with Hoochie the Scottie.

Following the separation of her parents, Jackie Bouvier lived with her mother and sister in a posh Park Avenue apartment building built and owned by her grandfather, James Thomas Lee. While there, she seemed to develop an affection for dogs of a far larger breed.

A Bouvier des Flandres.

A Bouvier des Flandres.

The family, recalled a niece of Janet Lee I interviewed for my 1997 oral history biography of Mrs. Onassis, especially recalled a very large dog of the Bouvier de Flandres breed.

The dog was likely acquired because his breed name was the same as his human family’s,  rather than as the ideal dog to make a home in a relatively small Park Avenue apartment.

One Sunday, when Mrs. Bouvier and her daughter returned from church, they found their home in a shambles. The dog had entirely wrecked the apartment, smashing lamps, tearing chair cushions and overturning bookcases.

He was soon given up for adoption.

No picture of the family dog, whose name is unknown, has surfaced to date.

Jackie Bouvier with her white bull terrier Regent at the 1935 East Hampton dog show.

Jackie Bouvier with her white bull terrier Regent at the 1935 East Hampton dog show.

With Bonnett, a spaniel in 1935.

With Bonnett, a spaniel in 1935.

Jacqueline Bouvier with her Great Dane, King Phar, apparently borrowed by her father. (animalfair.com)

Jacqueline Bouvier with her Great Dane, King Phar, apparently borrowed by her father. (animalfair.com)

Jackie in 1939 with her dog Tammy. (Getty)

Jackie in 1939 with her dog Tammy. (Getty)

Miss Bouvier with a dog identified as Tops, 1940. (likely Bert Morgan Photo)

Miss Bouvier with a dog identified as Tops, 1940. (likely Bert Morgan Photo)

With the remarriage of her mother in 1942 to Hugh D. Auchincloss, Jackie Bouvier moved to their home, Merrywood, in McLean, Virginia, attending middle school in Washington, D.C. for several years, before leaving for Miss Porter’s boarding school in Connecticut. In the summer months, although she still visited her father and his family in East Hampton, she spent most of her time at the Auchincloss summer home in Newport, Rhode Island, named Hammersmith Farm.

Acquired in 1945, her dog companion during these years was a poodle she named “Gaully,” in honor of the famous French World War II general, Charles De Gaulle.  Gaully became her constant companion when she was in McLean or Newport. However, until her marriage to U.S. Senator John F. Kennedy in September of 1953, Jackie was frequently away for long stretches. Initially enrolled at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York, then as an exchange student, living in Paris, it was not until 1950 that she settled back at home in McLean, commuting into Washington, D.C.,  to finish her degree at George Washington University. After a brief trip to Europe, Jackie got a job as both a newspaper reporter and photographer for the Washington Times-Herald.

Although she wrote occasional full-length feature stories, Miss Bouvier was primarily focused on her regular column, The Inquiring Cameragirl, in which she asked random people on the street a single question, providing their responses and snapping their picture to be included with it. On one occasion, she “interviewed” four dogs, including Gaully. Even after she married and lived in a series of homes, first in Virginia near that of her mother and stepfather, and then across the Potomac River in Georgetown, she remained attached to Gaully.

In fact, during a long day when the young Senate wife was followed by a photographer who’d been hired to take publicity pictures of her, she fortified herself for the camera with the presence of her friend Gaully. By this time, her mother had another poodle and during the increasingly long periods of time when Jackie was away, accompanying her husband on foreign junkets and helping in his 1958 Senate re-election campaign, Gaully stayed with Janet.

Although details of Gaully’s final days with Jackie are unknown, he would have been over twelve years old by the time her daughter Caroline was born, in 1957.

Jackie with her poodle Gaully, named after Charles De Gaulle.

Jackie with her poodle Gaully, named after Charles De Gaulle.

The Senator's wife with Gally, stopping to speak with a Georgetown shopkeeper.

The Senator’s wife with Gaully, stopping to speak with a Georgetown shopkeeper.

Jackie Kennedy with Gaullie, stopping to look in a Georgetown art gallery window.

Jackie Kennedy with Gaully, stopping to look in a Georgetown art gallery window.

An unknown collie dog jumps a broom with Jackie Kennedy and daughter Caroline, circa 1959.

An unknown collie dog jumps a broom with Jackie Kennedy and daughter Caroline, circa 1959. (Mark Shaw)

At a presidential campaign tea at the home of her mother with whom Jackie Kennedy stands, and a poodle, perhaps Gaully, between them November 1960 (Corbis)

At a 1960 presidential campaign tea at the home of her mother with whom Jackie Kennedy stands a poodle, the color of whom suggests it was not Gaully.  (Corbis)

By the time, John F. Kennedy was running for President, Jackie had a new dog, Charlie the Welsh Terrier, whom she bought as a gift for her husband.

She taught her toddler to trust and enjoy Charlie but ostensibly at least, he was “Jack’s dog.”

Jackie Kennedy walking with her toddler daughter and Charlie the Welsh terrier along the beach at Hyannis, 1960.

Jackie Kennedy walking with her toddler daughter and Charlie the Welsh terrier along the beach at Hyannis, 1960.(Mark Shaw)

President Kennedy walks with Charlie the dog at the First Family's weekend home Glen Ora in the Virginia hunt country.

President Kennedy walks with Charlie the dog at the First Family’s weekend home Glen Ora in the Virginia hunt country.

With her husband’s election to the presidency and her move to the White House in January of 1960 with her daughter and new-born son John, Jackie’s menagerie of dogs not only increased but became familiar names and faces to the American public.

In a way which most closely resembled the closeness and physical comfort she seemed to have found with Gaully, among the White House dogs the one she most closely bonded with was a German Shepherd by the name of Clipper.

Clipper had been a gift to her from her father-in-law, former U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, Joseph P. Kennedy. In a life where her husband was more often away than around her and she was surrounded by a phalanx of unfamiliar men in black suits and sunglasses intended to protect her, Jackie Kennedy seemed to find her greatest emotional protection from others in her companionship with Clipper.

There was, perhaps, more than humor in her response to inquisitive news women who asked her what Clipped liked to eat.

Considering such questions intrusive, the First Lady purred back, “Reporters.”

Jackie and Clipper outside the Oval Office.

Jackie and Clipper outside the Oval Office.

The First Lady with Clipper as she pulls her son John in a sled over the Jefferson mounds of the White House South Lawn.

The First Lady with Clipper as she pulls her son John in a sled over the Jefferson mounds of the White House South Lawn.

Mrs. Kennedy tries to save a stuffed toy dog given to her son by the President of Italy from having its ear torn by Clipper.

Mrs. Kennedy tries to save a stuffed toy dog given to her son by the President of Italy from having its ear torn by Clipper.

Perhaps the most noteworthy of all the dog companions to Jacqueline Kennedy was a fur ball who obtained global fame.

In between the tense talks held by President Kennedy in Vienna with Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev in April of 1961 was a dinner and performance held for the principals at the Schoenberg Palace. Khrushchev cozied up to the American First Lady and the duo began a Jackie launched her own little missile by raising a topic of Soviet space program, a record soon to be surpassed by that of the U.S. Khrushchev distracted her away from pinning him on specifics about the Soviet program by indulging her known love of dogs. He bragged of the brave mixed-breed Strelka who, after surviving an earlier rocket mission, lived in a such a state of communist compassion that she recently delivered a healthy litter of four puppies. Jackie threw Nikki a challenge: send her one of these thriving puppies. In fact, he would – along with nine bottles of Soviet perfume. He later wrote, “I liked her very much. She knew how to make jokes and was, as our people say, quick with her tongue. In other words, she had no trouble finding the right word to cut you short if you weren’t careful with her….But even in small talk she demonstrated her intelligence.”

Jackie named the dog “Pushinka,” and she became an especially loving dog, gentle and observant – but Clipper ruled the family roost. At the same time that the First Lady became pregnant, so too did Pushinka by Charlie the Welsh terrier. Inundated with some 5,000 letters from American children begging for one of the four puppies born to Pushinka, Jackie created an essay contest, and acted as judge in awarding each of the top two child-writers with one of the litter. Behind the charming little episode, however, the First Lady offered subtext, making the theme of her essay contest “world peace.”

Jackie named the four puppies Butterfly, White Tips, Blackie, and Streaker.

Soviet Space Dog Strelka with one of her puppies Jackie Kennedy dared Khrushchev to send her - and he did.

Soviet Space Dog Strelka with her puppies, one of whom Jackie Kennedy dared Khrushchev to send her – and he did. She named the female “Pushinka.” She is one of the two white dogs being nursed by Strelka.

Pushinka begs for some scraps from White House handyman on their lunch break.

Pushinka begs for some scraps from White House handyman on their lunch break.

Butterfly was given to one of the child essay-winners, Karen House of Westchester Illinois, and Streaker to the other winner, Mark Bruce of Columbia, Missouri.

In the August 1963 days following the loss of her own baby, Patrick, avoiding any further trauma to Caroline and John, Jackie decided not to immediately give away all of the newborn babies of Pushinka. At least until they all returned to Washington in the fall, Blackie and White Tips remained in the Kennedy menagerie.

In fact, that menagerie had grown suddenly crowded two months earlier, following the President’s trip to Ireland.

As a gift to commemorate the visit to his ancestral homeland, the Irish Ambassador presented the First Family with two more dogs, an Irish wolfhound whom Jackie called Wolf, and a small Irish spaniel, called Shannon.

Too crowded, perhaps, for little Pushinka.

The famous dog was literally out of the picture when the family gathered for a photo at the end of August in 1963. Joining Charlie, who was older than five years old, and Clipper, who was just about three years old, were White Tips, Blackie, Wolf, and Shannon.

Within three months, however, all of Jackie’s dogs, except for one, would be gone.

The Kennedy dogs Clipper the German Shepherd, Charlie the Welsh terrier, Wolf the Irish Wolfhound, Shannon the Irish Spaniel. Blackie and Streaker, the two puppies of Pushinka kept by the First Family for a brief time sit on the First Lady's lap

The Kennedy dogs Clipper the German Shepherd, Charlie the Welsh terrier, Wolf the Irish Wolfhound, Shannon the Irish Spaniel. Blackie and White Tips, the two puppies of Pushinka kept by the First Family for a brief time sit on the First Lady’s lap.

One of the few close-up pictures of the Kennedy dog Wolf, grasped by the president's daughter. 001

One of the few close-up pictures of the Kennedy dog Wolf, grasped by the president’s daughter.

Jackie Kennedy with Clipper and her husband, just twelve days before he was killed.

Jackie Kennedy with Clipper and her husband, just twelve days before he was killed

Having to suddenly move out of her home in the White House, upon the death of her husband in November of 1963, Jackie Kennedy had to scramble to find at least a temporary home in a place where her childrens’ lives could remain as uninterrupted as possible. The new President, Lyndon B. Johnson offered to permit the small school group which composed Caroline Kennedy’s kindergarten to continue to gather in the third-floor solarium of the White House, and all of the late President’s papers and possessions had to be processed from Washington. Rather than relocate to the one home she owned, a new house she’d had built called Wexford, on the outskirts of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Jackie accepted the offer of family friend, Ambassador Averell Harriman, to occupy his house in Georgetown, until one she would soon purchase nearby, was ready.

It was perhaps a matter of more than downsizing, however, which led Jackie Kennedy to give away all of the White House dogs.

Shortly thereafter, White Tips went to the longtime Kennedy family nursemaid Luella Hennessy, and Blackie to the household of the President’s sister and brother-in-law, Pat and Peter Lawford. Charlie went with Secret Service Agent Bob Foster. Famous Pushinka went to Ivan Williams, who was either a family friend or staff member.

It must have been bewildering for Clipper to suddenly lose not just the only home he’d ever known but also his close human companion Jackie. To whom he was given remains uncertain.

The only one who remained would be Shannon, who was rapidly growing. While it is only speculation, at the time Jackie found her closest emotional touchstones to her husband to be anything associated with his love of Ireland. And Wolf the Wolfhound would be quickly growing to a monstrously larger size than even Shannon.

It’s unclear who adopted Wolf – but Shannon stayed.

In fact, Shannon would remain close to Jackie Kennedy when, less than a year after the assassination, she relocated back to her roots, the city where she’d spent her own childhood, New York. And rather than have a Secret Service agent or one of the few servants who did come to work for her in her 15-room apartment at 1040 Fifth Avenue,  Jackie liked to walk her own dog.

Granted, it was some years before New York, like all major cities, would enact “pooper-scooper” laws, but Jackie Kennedy might have discovered that she could enjoy relative anonymity among the tourists visiting the Metropolitan Museum of Art across the street or in Central Park simply by walking her dog.

Few would have imagined that “the world’s most famous woman” would be on the other end of a leash from a shaggy, mottled spaniel dog.

Just weeks after the assassination, the widowed First Lady walks Shannon in Georgetown near her new, temporary home with daughter Caroline and half-sister Janet, 1964.

Just weeks after the assassination, the widowed First Lady walks Shannon in Georgetown near her new, temporary home with daughter Caroline and half-sister Janet, 1964.

Caroline Kennedy hugs Shannon in the summer of '64, as Jackie Kennedy looks on.

Caroline Kennedy hugs Shannon in the summer of ’64, as Jackie Kennedy looks on.

The whole family in September of 1966. The former First Lady walks her daughter to school down 86th Street from Fifth Avenue, trailed by her son John. (Corbis)

The whole family in September of 1966. The former First Lady walks her daughter to school down 86th Street from Fifth Avenue, trailed by her son John. (Corbis)

A Secret Service agent blocks a photographer from snapping Shannon...and Jackie, April 1967.

A Secret Service agent blocks a photographer from snapping Shannon…and Jackie, April 1967.

Shannon might have indeed been the dog with the record of longest companionship to Jackie, at least twelve years – which gave Gaully a run for his money.

As her children aged and she remarried, to Aristotle Onassis, in October of 1968, Shannon kept up with them all.  There the little fellow was, showing up in paparazzi images of “Jackie O” walking in and out of airports, in Athens and New York. And, at least one photograph, snapped of Jackie in her bedroom at 1040 Fifth Avenue in 1975, shows a very elderly Shannon sitting on her left leg while another, younger Irish spaniel, rests on her right. Son, or daughter of Shannon? It’s uncertain.

One other startling aspect of Jackie O’s continued love of dogs is that she also had an influence on her husband Ari.

Famous for his short tempter and impatience with people, no matter how important, one paparazzi captured the mighty Onassis exiting his apartment on the Avenue Foch in Paris – being pulled along by his very own black Labrador Retriever, thought the fellow’s name is unknown.

Jackie Onassis and her children arrive in Greece with Shannon their dog, 1969.

Jackie Onassis and her children arrive in Greece with Shannon, 1969.

As Jackie Onassis, walking Shannon at night in tie-dye pants, December 1969.

In tie-dye pants, Jackie O walks the dog at night on Fifth Avenue, December 1970.

Jackie O, her children and a dog which appears to be at least partially a German Shorthaired Pointer at a Greek airport 1972.

Jackie Onassis, her children and a dog who appears to perhaps be a German Short-haired Pointer mix (or is it Shannon with a trim and looking a bit larger?) at a Greek airport 1972

Jackie Onassis in her 1040 Fifith Avenue bedroom with what appears to be an elderly Shannon and another unknown dog. (oriiginal photographer unknown)

Jackie Onassis in her 1040 Fifth Avenue bedroom with an elderly Shannon and his son Whiskey, 1975. (original photographer from Marta Scubin’s memoir Cooking For Madam)

Ari Onassis walks his own black labrador retriever in Paris. (Getty)

Ari Onassis walks his own Black Lab in Paris. (Getty)

Aristotle Onassis died in March of 1975. His widow returned to the work force for the first time in twenty-two years that September, employed first at Viking Press and then Doubleday as a trade book editor. Her daughter had already left home at that time, studying in London and then going to college. Her son would be home for only two more years before he too left, for boarding school and then college. The apartment was soon devoid of regular tenants to walk and care for a dog.

And indeed, there were certainly no more pictures, at least which the public saw, which documented that Jackie Kennedy Onassis had any more canine companions until her death in 1994.

Still, when alone in her apartment, the presence of dogs was still felt.

Tomorrow, will be a look at some of the canine-themed furnishings Jackie used in her homes and the dogged influence she had on her son, John Kennedy, Jr. who also became an avid companion to at least two pooches.

Jackie Onassis walking alone into her office building. (Life)

Jackie Onassis walking alone into her office building. (Life)


Categories: Dogs, First Ladies, Presidents, Presidents and Animals, The Kennedys

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16 replies »

  1. Carl-you have done it again-Great pictures and post…once again-I see pics on this site i have never seen before.

    Would very much like to make a financial contribution to help support this blog-is that appropriate?

    At any rate-thank you again-I will continue to enjoy reading your posts.Also looking forward to the Ida McKinley biography.

    best-Richard Klein

    On Thu, Feb 28, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Carl Anthony Online wrote:

    > ** > carlanthonyonline.com posted: “[caption id="attachment_15510" > align="aligncenter" width="530"] Two-year old Miss Bouvier with her > apparent first dog, name and breed unknown, 1931.[/caption] From her > earliest childhood days on Long Island, through her youth in New York, > Newport, Rhod”

    • Well thank you very much Richard – I seriously appreciate that. And I also appreciate the offer for a contribution. Certainly it is welcome, since the articles appear here for free (although with copyright reprinting restriction) but I have yet to determine the policy on contributions at WordPress for this at the particular annual membership level to which I’m subscribed. I need to write those behind the scenes; I know I’m not permitted to have advertising. Meanwhile, the McKinley biography will be out later this year and I am working on the last stages of it right now. Thanks again.

  2. Regarding the photo of Jackie sitting on the floor of her Fifth Avenue bedroom, Marta Sgubin uses this photo in her book ‘Cooking for Madam’ and says that the Irish spaniel on the left is Shannon and the one on the right is Whiskey, who was Shannon’s son. I don’t find any information in the book giving the source of the photo.

    • Dear L.H. You have really shown your support this time! I so much appreciate your providing that information. So many pictures start floating around the Internet and very quickly people cease to credit the sources – and then suddenly the image is everywhere and there’s no tracing it back to the original photographer. If someone took a photo, even if it has long passed into becoming a public domain one, I still strive to determine who it is, after all it is their work. Whenever I purchase an old photo or it is in my image library and then I scan it, having it appear for the first time, to my knowledge, if it is almost certainly a public domain source I will put my watermark on it so people can trace it back to this website where I also always include the photographer or agency, if known, in the caption. And considering that this is a snapshot from Marta’s book and that she often took pictures of the family, I will credit her and her book as the source. And furthermore – thanks for providing the information. Another reader here also has done so and I will make the really helpful clarifications to the article.

  3. White Tips went to Luella Hennessy.Peter Lawford got Blackie. Butterfly went to Karen House of Westchester Ill. Streaker went to Mark Bruce of Columbia, Mo. Ivan Williams , took Pushinka. Charlie went with SSA Bob Foster.

    • Dear Michelle – This is fantastic, thank you. Amazing that in just a few hours after this article appeared that you and another reader have been able to provide some specific facts, helping to clarify the piece. I will edit the article to include your generous addition. Thank you again.

      • You’re Most welcome! If you want some photos of Karen House and Mark Bruce you can find the in Life Magazine Dated August 30th 1963 page 29. If I recall Mark Bruce’s story it was that he had accidently hit his dog with a baseball bat when he swung it to hit the ball not knowing his dog was behind him.
        I wish I knew what happened to Clipper. I hears from some one that he was a Wexford,and that he had his leg ran over by the toonyville trolley that the Kennedy children played on,but I don’t know what happened to him after that. It would be nice to know. I can relate to Mrs.Kennedy being comforted by her dogs..Mine have helped me,as well.. Glad I could help out -Michelle

        • I won’t tell you just how highly I value dogs – all dogs, not just those I’ve been companions to. But poke around the site and you can figure it out! How horrible that story of the bat – God, I mean accidents happen but…I don’t know….Dogs are delicate beings, vulnerable to so much. Anyway, enough in that direction – just that the bit of info you offered really brings some closure to their stories. Will have a second related article tomorrow. Cheers.

  4. I enjoyed reading this and yesterday’s piece Carl. Little known, but so poignant, they reveal a lot about Jackie and her son. I had read some time ago that he adopted a rescue dog from a shelter in NYC, and that impressed me a lot.

  5. I found another dog that Mrs.Kennedy owned in 1957,named Tippy. On you tube there is a clip of Mrs. Kennedy on a show called “Home” hosted by Arlene Francis. it aired on April 3 1957.It shows a tape of Mrs. Kennedy doung various errands and Tippy goes along.

  6. What a wonderful article with two of my favorite subjects — Jackie O and dogs! And dear Shannon looks a bit like my own dog Stanley, whom I adopted after he wandered into my backyard, a lost but very friendly puppy.

    • Dear Nancy – Thanks so much for making the effort to write – I think that her practically lifelong commitment to dogs reveals quite a bit about her character, especially the stories of her early writing about them. And to have a Stanley wander into your yard and then your life is a pretty extraordinary gift. I’ll be having lots more articles forthcoming soon about different aspects of dogs and our relationships with them. Thanks again.

  7. Fascinating, and for the most part, well-researched, article. I loved the photographs. But the dog Shannon was definitely not an “Irish spaniel” (there is no such breed, there is an Irish Water Spaniel, a taller, curly-haired brown dog); he was a blue roan-colored English Cocker Spaniel (they come in several colors; blue roan being the most common). English Cockers are handsome dogs when groomed and brushed; as well as being usually gentle and affectionate; it’s not surprising that Mrs. Kennedy chose to keep hers. As for the dog next to Shannon in the 1975 photo, he looks very much like an English Cocker Spaniel as well (the article doesn’t seem to know whether the younger dog is Shannon’s offspring; but the caption to the photo identifies him as “Whiskey, son of Shannon”). I own a blue roan English Cocker myself; but never realized that the Kennedys had one too. I’m glad that Mrs. Kennedy kept Shannon; though I wish she could have kept some of the others as well (though it’s understandable that she did not) after President Kennedy’s murder.

  8. Pushinka was twice offered to the GSA\WH electrician (1948-1972) and official kennel manager during JFK administration Traphles L Bryant (1914-1986) firstly in June 1963 (which he refused as he was moving into a new apartment and didn’t have room for a dog) and in December 196 just before leaving the WH, he said he needed time to think it over. During that time Bryant was approached by Ivan Williams the head WH gardener who was told by JBK that if Bryant didn’t want Pushinka he could have her. Willas you rightly say took her.

  9. Wow, what a marvellous discovery… you know I’ve got a couple of Kennedy dreams on my blog that may more than passingly engage you… great blog… glad to have found you….

Trackbacks

  1. Jackie Kennedy’s Dogged Influence on JFK Jr. & Canine-Themed Homes « Carl Anthony Online
  2. Grace Coolidge, her White Collies, Coolidge Animal Love & Why JFK and Jackie Kennedy Liked Her: A Photo Essay « Carl Anthony Online
  3. Jackie Kennedy’s Mid-Century Modern Luncheon: Part I, The Kodachrome Years « Carl Anthony Online
  4. Jackie Kennedy’s Mid-Century Modern Luncheon: Part 2, Covering First Ladies « Carl Anthony Online
  5. Jackie Kennedy’s Mid-Century Luncheon: Part 3, Reporter Bouvier on the Job « Carl Anthony Online
  6. Jackie Kennedy’s Mid-Century Modern Luncheon: Part 4, The Subversive Senate Wife « Carl Anthony Online
  7. Jackie Kennedy’s Mid-Century Modern Luncheon: Part 5, Intention & Achievement « Carl Anthony Online
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